NewsBuilding Futures

SRCLC Building Futures Project

The Savannah Regional Central Labor Council Building Futures Project focuses on identifying high school students in poverty-dense districts and providing them with opportunities through apprentice programs available through local labor unions. Through technical assistance and training, union support and community investment. SRCLC Building Futures Project works to help students create trade career paths that offer economic opportunity, advancement and self-sufficiency.

 

Vison

With a poverty rate of 27% in the City of Savannah, SRCLC Building Futures Project specifically counters generational poverty by offering high school students who are not college bound a track to learn trade skills through local labor unions.

Target Population

  • Chatham County High Schools students 18 years and older, men and women
  • Unemployed or under employed and desiring employment
  • Low Income
  • Those facing systemic or cultural barriers to a traditional college path

Strategies

  • Establish Relationships with in the area high schools advocating for  the students that want to make economic changes in their lives
  • Identify and promote best trades practices for each student
  • Work to help remove any barriers keeping student from reaching full potential
  • Provide technical assistance and training along with a support mechanism through the local unions.

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