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Below is a statement from Charlie Flemming, President of the Georgia AFL-CIO, on the importance of voting for Labor endorsed candidates in the December 4th Runoff Election.

The Georgia State AFL-CIO Announces Endorsed Candidates for the 2018 Midterm General Elections.

On March 24th, 2018, dozens of Union Veterans gathered to launch the Georgia Union Veteran’s Council.

Statement by Georgia AFL-CIO President Charlie Flemming in response to the Republican tax bill passing the Senate:

Both versions of the GOP tax bill, which passed the House and the Senate, respectively, are a direct attack on working people in Georgia and across America. This bill is an attempt by the wealthy and corporate elites in our nation to rig the economy against the working families.

Georgia State AFL-CIO President Charlie Flemming made the following statement on the announcement that the Trump administration will terminate the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program:

The Georgia AFL-CIO fully supports Georgia Power and its decision to complete the Vogtle project. The completion of this  multi-billion dollar investment means the 4,500 highly skilled craft members of the North America Building Trades will continue to stay on the job.

Over the weekend in Charlottesville, Virginia, the nation and the world witnessed the hateful views and terrorist acts committed by white supremacists and neo-Nazis. This racism and bigotry has no place in America. In this country, we have always fought, in solidarity, for equality and justice and against these and other diabolical prejudices.

This is the time for leadership. Our leaders, both in DC and under the Gold Dome, must acknowledge this for what it is: domestic terrorism rooted in bigotry.

According to a recent article by The Guardian, Nissan is waging one of "the nastiest anti-union campaigns in US history." Not only has Nissan taken out ads on local television stations, they have also been accused of bribing workers to vote against unionizations.

Nissan is sending a clear message: they fear the power that a union gives their workers. Companies like Nissan want to continue to exploit the South, and its African-American and Latinx workers in particular, for cheap labor and resources. 

Eight hundred thousand workers. That is the number of government employees and contractors impacted by President Trump’s shutdown of the federal government. The average take home pay of impacted workers is around $500 per week, and any financial uncertainty is sure to cause stress and anxiety over how to make ends meet. Each day of this manufactured crisis, working families lose money for housing, healthcare and groceries — the essentials we need to get by.

Furloughed federal employees and out-of-work contractors greeted one another Thursday with a sarcastic nickname that, on the 20th day of a partial government shutdown, captured their feeling of powerlessness: “Hello, fellow pawns.”

They shouted it to one another over the brutal wind and bitter cold on Thursday in downtown Washington, where hundreds gathered to demand government leaders put an end to the shutdown and allow them to get back to work.

1. Janus dealt a heavy blow to labor—but public-sector unions didn’t crumble overnight.

In June, the Supreme Court issued its long-awaited ruling in Janus v. AFSCME—and it was just as bad as everyone feared. In a 5-to-4 decision, the court found that public-sector unions violated the First Amendment by collecting so-called fair-share fees from workers who aren’t union members but benefit from collective bargaining regardless.