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The Georgia State AFL-CIO Announces Endorsed Candidates for the 2018 Midterm General Elections.

On March 24th, 2018, dozens of Union Veterans gathered to launch the Georgia Union Veteran’s Council.

Georgia State AFL-CIO President Charlie Flemming made the following statement on the announcement that the Trump administration will terminate the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program

Statement by Georgia AFL-CIO President Charlie Flemming in response to the Republican tax bill passing the Senate:

Both versions of the GOP tax bill, which passed the House and the Senate, respectively, are a direct attack on working people in Georgia and across America. This bill is an attempt by the wealthy and corporate elites in our nation to rig the economy against the working families.

The Georgia AFL-CIO fully supports Georgia Power and its decision to complete the Vogtle project. The completion of this  multi-billion dollar investment means the 4,500 highly skilled craft members of the North America Building Trades will continue to stay on the job.

Over the weekend in Charlottesville, Virginia, the nation and the world witnessed the hateful views and terrorist acts committed by white supremacists and neo-Nazis. This racism and bigotry has no place in America. In this country, we have always fought, in solidarity, for equality and justice and against these and other diabolical prejudices.

This is the time for leadership. Our leaders, both in DC and under the Gold Dome, must acknowledge this for what it is: domestic terrorism rooted in bigotry.

According to a recent article by The Guardian, Nissan is waging one of "the nastiest anti-union campaigns in US history." Not only has Nissan taken out ads on local television stations, they have also been accused of bribing workers to vote against unionizations.

Nissan is sending a clear message: they fear the power that a union gives their workers. Companies like Nissan want to continue to exploit the South, and its African-American and Latinx workers in particular, for cheap labor and resources. 

Labor has always held electoral power, especially when wielded by women. Former Secretary of Labor Francis Perkins’s lifelong dedication to workers’ rights was sparked by witnessing the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire of 1911, in which 146 people — predominantly young Jewish immigrant women — died, most as a result of locked factory doors. Though they shunned the ballot box, legendary political radicals like Lucy Parsons, Emma Goldman, and Elizabeth Gurley Flynn were all labor organizers.

Labor union leaders Liz Shuler and Mary Kay Henry discuss how they rose up through the union ranks and what they’re trying to do to increase the number of women in the labor movement. Shuler, secretary-treasurer of the AFL-CIO, and Henry, president of the Service Employees International Union, also weigh in on recent Supreme Court decisions, Brett Kavanaugh's nomination, and what that all means for the future of the labor movement.

Listen to the full episode.

As Labor Day approached, the movement that created the holiday flexed its muscle in Seattle, where the landscape has been transformed in the last few years by labor-backed measures protecting and compensating people like in few other places across the country.

President Donald Trump has presented himself as a champion of the American worker and vowed to restore factory jobs.