UNITE HERE Local 23 Renews Contract at Westin

Congratultaions to members of UNITE HERE Local 23 on their new contract at The Atlanta Westin Peachtree Plaza that includes new job security language. 

Local 23 President Wanda Brown, a bartender at the Westin and the President of Local 23 Atlanta, talks about the struggle for the new contract. 

“There is nothing we cannot do or win if we work together. We didn’t just negotiate at the table, we did actions and showed the Westin Peachtree that we were serious and united.”

How does it feel to win such a great contract after a long fight? 
“It feels good. We fought for this together and we should be proud of our victory together. It was so great to see all my coworkers coming together. When we did the photo campaign we all worked really hard to make sure that workers knew what was at stake. We wanted all of our coworkers to have the opportunity to take a photo and be involved. It didn’t matter if that person was in our department or not. We worked together to win.”

 

Congratulations  to AFSCME Local 1644 on a successful Back to School drive.  Thanks to all who donated to the effort.

CEO pay for major companies in the United States rose nearly 6% in the past year, as income inequality and the outsourcing of good-paying American jobs have increased. According to the new AFL-CIO Executive Paywatch, the average CEO of an S&P 500 Index company made $13.94 million in 2017—361 times more money than the average U.S. rank-and-file worker.

Tefere Gebre came to the United States in 1984 as a teenager. He and four friends had left their home in war-torn Ethiopia and walked nearly 500 miles across the desert to a refugee camp in Sudan.

Monie Stewart-Cariaga recently decided to leave the townhouse she’s renting to buy a new home. For a single cocktail server, she couldn’t be in a better position to do it. Beyond the fair wage and tips she earns at the Paris Las Vegas Hotel and Casino, Stewart-Cariaga plans to take advantage of a home-buying assistance program run by the Culinary Workers Union Local 226, the powerful union that represents service workers like her on the Vegas strip.

With growing membership, a budget back in the black and a strike fund that is rising by the year, the Auto Workers are much stronger than they were four years ago, retiring union President Dennis Williams says.

And if you really want a comparison, Williams added one bombshell at the end of his keynote address to the union’s convention, which opened June 11 in Detroit: “We have looked death in the eyes during the Great Recession.”

A federal court in Philadelphia struck down a new city law that barred employers from asking job candidates about their salary history. The ruling has serious ramifications for the fight to narrow the gender wage gap.

Graduate student unions are in the news again, with campuses across the US deciding to allow--and not to allow--graduate students to unionize. 

In October 2016, we reported that National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) would require private universities to bargain with graduate student labor unions on compensation and working conditions. 

It's no secret that the financial divide between CEOs and average worker in the U.S. has been growing. But in one case, the pay gap between corporate chiefs and employees has reached almost 6,000-to-1: Weight Watchers, where CEO Mindy Grossman earned 5,908 times what the median worker took home last year.

An ideologically divided Supreme Court ruled Monday that companies may require workers to settle employment disputes through individual arbitration rather than joining to press their complaints, a decision affecting as many as 25 million workers.

The court's conservative majority said that the 5-to-4 ruling was a logical reading of federal law, and Congress' preference for using arbitration to avoid costly and time-consuming litigation.

President Trump’s attention of late has been focused in part on the United States Postal Service and Amazon, resulting in a new executive order calling for an evaluation of USPS finances. This is a good opportunity to underscore some important facts regarding the Postal Service, a national treasure belonging to all the people of the United States.

It only takes a moment talking to Emily Galvin, an apprentice with Ironworkers Local 7 in Boston, to grasp how her first year learning the skilled trades has transformed her life. For one, she has a fresh understanding of the anatomy of a city—of roads, bridges and buildings. She’s taking classes in structural steel, tension, rebar and labor history. “I love how we use mats of rebar,” Ms. Galvin says, “to make reinforced concrete for floors or knee-walls, like for a parking garage.”